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Health Beliefs and Locus of control as predictors of cancer - Adebimpe Oluwafisayo Adenike1
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Описание Health Beliefs and Locus of control as predictors of cancer - Adebimpe Oluwafisayo Adenike

This study assessed the level of awareness and attitude towards breast and cervical cancer screening among women in Obafemi Awolowo University community. The results showed that 63.0% and 84.4% were aware of cervical cancer screening and breast cancer screening respectively.

Age and occupation were significantly associated with the likelihood to screen for cervical cancer while occupation was the only variable that was significantly associated with the likelihood to screen for breast cancer. The study revealed that health belief factors were not significant predictors of breast cancer screening behaviour. However, occupation, perceived benefits of screening, internal locus of control and health risks behaviour all significantly predicted cervical cancer screening behaviour of women.

Respondents in the non academic posts were less likely to uptake cervical cancer screening compared with the academic staff and students. The study concluded that women were more knowledgeable about breast cancer than cervical cancer.

Health beliefs, perceived benefits and locus of control were significant predictors of cervical, but not breast cancer screening behaviour.},